Cryptocurrencies: 5,988
Markets: 545
Marketcap: $ 501.26 B
24h Vol: $ 129.14 B
BTC Dominance: 61.92%

Global market data

Cryptocurrencies: 5,988
Markets: 545
Marketcap: $ 501.26 B
24h Vol: $ 129.14 B
BTC Dominance: 61.92%

[ZEROHEDGE] Creditors Finally Wake Up To An Apocalyptic Reality: Bond Losses As High As 99%

Zero Hedge

Creditors Finally Wake Up To An Apocalyptic Reality: Bond Losses As High As 99%

Tyler Durden

Mon, 10/26/2020 – 11:55

Back in March 2016, we published an article explaining how the coming default cycle – when it finally hits – would be different: it would be marked by record low recovery rates. While there were many reasons for that, three stood out: i) the disconnect between fundamentals and asset prices thanks to the Fed’s constant manipulation of markets, ii) the record layering of debt upon debt, much of it secured, and iii) the years of covenant-lite deals that stripped most if not all creditor protections over the past decade (something which as we noted recently has resulted in bitter creditor fights and a “civil war” involving some of the most prominent names in investing).

Fast forward to today when Bloomberg picks up on what we said almost five years ago an in “Bond Defaults Deliver 99% Losses in New Era of U.S. Bankruptcies” writes that more and more, bondholders are fighting over recoveries as low as 1 cent.

The story should be familiar as we have discussed in constantly in recent months: in a post-covid world, where bankruptcy filings are surging, many lenders are coming to the realization that their claims are almost completely worthless, just as we warned would happen in 2016.

Instead of recouping, say, 40 cents for every dollar owed, as has been the norm for years, unsecured creditors now face the unenviable prospect of walking away with just pennies — if that.

Several stark examples of this epic collapse in recoveries is the current price of a handful of retailers’ bonds. Men’s Wearhouse, which filed in August, traded this month for less than 2 cents on the dollar. When J.C. Penney Co. went bankrupt, an auction held for holders of default protection found the retailer’s lowest-priced debt was worth just 0.125 cents on the dollar. For Neiman Marcus that figure was 3 cents. Indeed, as the following chart of median CDS auctions finds record low recoveries for bondholders (which of course is great news for all those who bought the CDS).

Join our Telegram channels

Join our Telegram group ➡️ t.me/Liquidary

Follow us Twitter ➡️ twitter.com/liquidary

 

Find the full article here

You have successfully subscribed to the newsletter

There was an error while trying to send your request. Please try again.

Liquidary.com will use the information you provide on this form to be in touch with you and to provide updates and marketing. You can unsubscribe anytime.